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Propolis and Colon Cancer

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Clover, Bee, and Revery

Reverie (revery) –(n.) state of dreamy meditation or fanciful musing; a fantastic, visionary, or impractical idea

Psalms from the Hive, by Jeannie Saum

Active heathy, hive box

Active heathy, hive box

Life is hard, sometimes

But hold on to hope

And look for help

From God’s creations.

There are many studies found on the National Institute of Health and GreenMedInfo websites regarding propolis and colon cancer.  The studies done in vitro (in a lab dish on cells) and on animals, show that propolis inhibits the growth of colon cancers sells in various ways.  Unfortunately, there are no clinical studies, as yet, on human beings, so this encouraging news is preliminary and needs further study.  Despite the limitations of the studies done so far, if I had cancer, I would certainly consider the use of propolis as an adjunct therapy  to whatever else was prescribed.

Here are summaries of some of the promising studies I have found.propolis tincture

“Chemoprevention of colon carcinogenesis by phenylethyl-3-methylcaffeate”, by Rao CV1, Desai D, Rivenson A, Simi B, Amin S, Reddy BS, states that previous studies have established that caffeic acid esters present in propolis, are potent inhibitors of human colon adenocarcinoma cell growth, carcinogen-induced biochemical changes, and preneoplastic lesions in the rat colon. The present study was designed to investigate the chemopreventive action of dietary phenylethyl-3-methylcaffeate (PEMC), from propolis,  on azoxymethane-induced colon carcinogenesis,the colonic mucosa and tumor tissues in male rats. At 5 weeks of age, groups of rats were fed the control diet, or a diet containing 750 ppm of PEMC. At 7 weeks of age, all animals except those in the vehicle (normal saline)-treated groups were given 2 weekly  injections of azoxymethane (cancer inducing agent). All groups were maintained on their respective dietary regimen until the termination of the experiment 52 weeks after the carcinogen treatment.

The results indicate that dietary administration of PEMC (from propolis) significantly inhibited the incidence and multiplicity of invasive, noninvasive, and total (invasive plus noninvasive) adenocarcinomas of the colon. Dietary PEMC also suppressed the colon tumor volume by 43% compared to the control diet. Animals fed the PEMC diet showed inhibited formation of colonic tumors by 15-30%. The precise mechanism by which PEMC inhibits colon tumorigenesis remains to be discovered.   Find this study at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7757981

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In a study from 2008,  titled,” Growth inhibitory activity of ethanol extracts of Chinese and Brazilian propolis in four human colon carcinoma cell lines”, by Ishihara M1, Naoi K, Hashita M, Itoh Y,  and Suzui M,  alcohol extracts of  Chinese and Brazillian propolis were tested on  four human colon carcinoma cell lines.  The findings indicate that the ethanol extracts of propolis contain components that may have anticancer activity.  Some cancers cells succumbed after only 72 hours of treatment.  Thus, propolis and related products may provide a novel approach to the chemoprevention and treatment of human colon carcinoma.  This study can be found at    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19578776.

                                              ~  ~  ~

“The contribution of plukenetione A to the anti-tumoral activity of Cuban propolis, by Díaz-Carballo D1, Malak S, Bardenheuer W, Freistuehler M, Peter Reusch H, studied Cuban propolis as a source of possible anti-cancer agents. The study found an anti-metastatic effect in mice and considerable cytotoxicity in both wild-type and chemoresistant human tumor cell lines. Plukenetione A– a component identified for the first time in Cuban propolis–induced G0/G1 arrest and DNA fragmentation in colon carcinoma cells.  This study can be found at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18951805.

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inside the hive

inside the hive

A study from 1995, called , “Caffeic acid phenethyl ester induces growth arrest and apoptosis of colon cancer cells via the beta-catenin/T-cell factor signaling”, by Xiang D1, Wang D, He Y, Xie J, Zhong Z, Li Z, Xie J, the effects of caffeic acid phenethyl ester (in propolis) on human colon cancer cells. Using two human sporadic colon cancer cell lines (HCT116 and SW480), they tested for cell growth inhibition, cell cycle and apoptosis induction.  Caffeic acid phenethyl ester completely inhibited growth, and induced G1 phase arrest and apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner in both HCT116 and SW480 cells.  Results of the study suggest that caffeic acid phenethyl ester merits further study as an agent against colorectal cancers.  The abstract of this study can be found at  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16926625.

                                              ~  ~  ~

“Greek propolis exhibits antiproliferative effects against human colon cancer cells”, done in 2010, by Harris Pratsinis, Dimitris Kletsas, Eleni Melliou, and Ioanna Chinou, tested  diterpenes and flavonoids, from Greek propolis, for their activities against human malignant and normal cell strains. They were found to be the most active against HT-29 human colon adenocarcinoma cells, without affecting normal human cells.  this study is found at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7757981.
                                              ~  ~  ~

“Chilean propolis: antioxidant activity and antiproliferative action in human tumor cell lines” published in 2004 by Russo A1, Cardile V, Sanchez F, Troncoso N, Vanella A, Garbarino JA. tested Chilean propolis for its antiproliferative capacity on KB (human mouth epidermoid carcinoma cells), Caco-2 (colon adenocarcinoma cells) and DU-145 (androgen-insensitive prostate cancer cells) human tumor cell lines. Results showed that this Chilean propolis sample scavenged free radicals and inhibits tumor cell growth.  Find this study at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15556167.

                                              ~  ~  ~

“Artepillin C in Brazilian propolis induces G(0)/G(1) arrest via stimulation of Cip1/p21 expression in human colon cancer cells”, from 2005, by Shimizu K1, Das SK, Hashimoto T, Sowa Y, Yoshida T, Sakai T, Matsuura Y, Kanazawa K. added Artepillin C (from propolis)  to human colon cancer cells. It dose-dependently inhibited cell growth.  Artepillin C appears to prevent colon cancer through the induction of cell-cycle arrest and to be a useful chemopreventing factor in colon carcinogenesis.

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“Cytotoxicity of portuguese propolis: the proximity of the in vitro doses for tumor and normal cell lines” from 2014, states that  in vitro and in vivo data suggest that propolis has anticancer properties.  The phenolic extracts from Portuguese propolis  was evaluated using human tumor cell lines  – -breast adenocarcinoma, non-small cell lung carcinoma, colon carcinoma, cervical carcinoma, and hepatocellular carcinoma, and non-tumor primary cells. The studied propolis presented high cytotoxic potential for human tumor cell lines. Propolis phenolic extracts comprise phytochemicals that should be further studied for their bioactive properties against human colon carcinoma. In the other cases, the proximity of the in vitro cytotoxic doses for tumor and normal cell lines should be confirmed by in vivo tests.

Vote for Us – Wells Fargo Works for Small Business

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laurie dotson design:

We Need your Vote! Please Vote Multiple time:) Have a BEEautyful Day

Originally posted on BEEpothecary:

The Land of Milk and Honey

Your Vote is Needed!

Wells Fargo Works for Small Business

We posted our application to the Wells Fargo Small Business Contest. Please go to this website every day and vote for BEEpothecary. You can vote multiple time, just on different devices or log into WF multiple times. This will give us a chance to win $25,000 and mentoring for our business! Go and vote now!

Follow the Link to our Vote Page

Follow the Link Below to our Vote Page

https://wellsfargoworks.com/project?x=us-en_viewentriesandvote_1070

Your Health…Powered by BEES!

Blessings, Laurie, Pete, Jeannie and Steve -

Check out out Marketplace:  mkt.com/beepothecary

1 Chronicles 4:10    Jabez cried out to the God of Israel, “Oh, that you would bless me and enlarge my territory! Let your hand be with me, and keep me from harm so that I will be free from pain.” And God granted his request.

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Vote for Us – Wells Fargo Works for Small Business

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The Land of Milk and Honey

Your Vote is Needed!

Wells Fargo Works for Small Business

We posted our application to the Wells Fargo Small Business Contest. Please go to this website every day and vote for BEEpothecary. You can vote multiple time, just on different devices or log into WF multiple times. This will give us a chance to win $25,000 and mentoring for our business! Go and vote now!

Follow the Link to our Vote Page

Follow the Link Below to our Vote Page

 

https://wellsfargoworks.com/project?x=us-en_viewentriesandvote_1070

Your Health…Powered by BEES!

Blessings, Laurie, Pete, Jeannie and Steve -

Check out out Marketplace:  mkt.com/beepothecary

1 Chronicles 4:10    Jabez cried out to the God of Israel, “Oh, that you would bless me and enlarge my territory! Let your hand be with me, and keep me from harm so that I will be free from pain.” And God granted his request.

Beekeepers Have the Best Questions!

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Clover, Bee, and Revery

Reverie (revery) –(n.) state of dreamy meditation or fanciful musing; a fantastic, visionary, or impractical idea
Ohio State Beekeepers Association

Ohio State Beekeepers Association

Psalms from the Hive, by Jeannie Saum

Beekeepers together,

Learning from each other.

Trying to protect our bees

And reaping their treasures.

We attended the Ohio State Beekeepers’ Summer Conference in Oxford Ohio at Miami University last week.  We were able to learn from sessions we attended and Laurie and I (Jeannie) got to share our excitment and passion for propolis and other hive products in two sessions as well.  As usual, people come up with the “I wonder” questions that we can’t answer.  So I always come back from these meetings with things to investigate!

We had two interesting questions about propolis and our bee products.  One questions was whether or not propolis would help tinnitus (ringing in the ears).  The gentleman who asked this said that he had been told to take lipoflavinoids  for his tinnitus, and since we had mentioned that propolis and honey contain flavinoids, he wondered if these would help him.  Here’s what I found:

Lipoflavonoid is a proprietary, over-the-counter, dietary supplement formula created in 1961, by NUMARK Laboratories.  It is claimed by the manufacturer to improve circulation in the inner ear, as a means of combating tinnitus (ringing in the ears).   It is with a bioflavinoid found naturally in the peel of lemons and also has vitamin B6 and B12 (B complex), vitamin C, niacin, riboflavin, thiamine, choline, inositol, and pantothenic acid.  ]There is significant anecdotal evidence that  Lipoflavonoid helps relieve the symptoms of tinnitus by consumers.   It has not been expressly approved by the Food and Drug Administration for this purpose.

So, as far as propolis being used in place of lipflavonoid, I would say it is not the same.  However, I did find some other references to propolis for tinnitus.  The following is from an Ezine Article:

Tinnitus is a symptom that can be caused by ear infections, foreign objects or wax in the ear, nose allergies that prevent fluid drain, aging, as a side effect of  medications and excessive noise exposure. A  natural antibiotic like bee propolis can be used orally, starting propolis tincturewith a few drops and increasing each day to 25.  A mixture of garlic, alcohol, propolis and honey can be made and is considered to be an effective home remedy to treat tinnitus. Put 200 grams by weight of alcohol (vodka) and ground garlic  into a lidded container (mason jar works well), cover tightly, shake and put it in a cool dark place.  Shake daily.   After 2 weeks, add 30 grams of propolis tincture and 2 tbs of honey, to the garlic tincture and leave it for a few more days. Now the mixture is ready to treat tinnitus; drink few drops before having meal. Increase the number of drops with number of days.

I am not sure if any of this will work!  But it certainly can’t hurt.  Propolis kills bacteria, viruses and molds, and it is also anti-inflammatory – which means it will reduce swelling and inflammation.  Besides trying it orally, I would suggest trying a few drops of propolis oil in the ears, once or twice a day.  If the tinnitus is related to any germ or inflammation, this might help.  It’s worth a try!

The secwoundstickond question we had from someone at the conference, was whether BEEpothecary’s Propolis Wound Salve was safe for use with cloth diapers.  Being well beyond the child rearing years, I was not aware that some diaper creams can ruin the absorbency of cloth diapers and not wash out in the laundry!   Who knew?!  I researched this on the web and found several blogs and forums on this subject!  According to what I read, from experienced cloth-diaper-using-moms – the ingredients in BEEpothecary Wound Salve are all safe to use on with cloth diapers.  The main  ingredients include olive oil, shea butter,  and beeswax.  These are all listed as safe for cloth diapers.

There was one other question asked in one of our sessions, that I can not for the life of me, remember!  If you were at one of our sessions, and asked a question not answered here, comment and let us know what it was.  I know a woman asked about the use of propolis for some disorder I had not researched, but I can’t remember what it was.  I would love to find our the information, if someone could jog my memory!

Job 5

“But if I were you, I would appeal to God; I would lay my cause before him.
He performs wonders that cannot be fathomed, miracles that cannot be counted.
10 He provides rain for the earth; he sends water on the countryside.

Garlic Scapes Pesto

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The Land of Milk and Honey

Cooking with Honey

by Laurie Dotson 
Garlic in the garden

Garlic in the garden

Sorry, No honey cooking today!  How about garlic.

For years, We had this strange plant growing in our garden.  At the time, I loved flower gardening. I had multiple large gardens in my yards.  I would add any new or throw away perennials people would give me.  And If I didn’t have room, I would make a new garden.  Big, Beautiful flower gardens. I had an oasis.

Every Spring and early summer, I would notice this plant. A hardy plant, that would grow a spiked shoot and then over night it would curl.  When it flowered, it has tiny little flowers and then it would grow these bulbs off the end.  Later the bulbs would drop and the next year I had more plants.  I loved the shape and the color. I would use them in flower arrangements and potted arrangements.  Still never knew exactly what I had.  Until one day, when I dig up a huge mound of them.     I eat everything.     So I took a deep swiff of it and then bit into it! Yeowzers! I had garlic! GARLIC!  All these years, I had Garlic. I love Garlic.  Garlic is a staple in my kitchen. It goes in everything I cook.  I could grow these, along with other herbs and make food for the family. But Vegetable gardening ? Never a consideration…until!

After a quick internet search on garlic. I learned how to care and grow garlic cloves.  I now have 200 garlic plants and that is where the garlic scapes come from.  What do you do with all your scapes??  Well we saute’ them with veggies, I roast them with meat, I cut them ups and add them to a salad… or I make this Garlic Scape Pesto is a great way to use something we get a whole heck of a lot of this time of year. When you grow two hundred heads of garlic, guess how many garlic scapes you get? That is correct – you get two hundred garlic scapes. That’s a lot.

Scapes are important to the garlic – it’s how more garlic plants happen. There are little seeds in the bigger round part, and if you leave the scapes in place, they would eventually burst open, scattering ripe seeds around, which will germinate and make more garlic plants. Unfortunately, in so doing, they draw nutrients away from the growing of the bulb they are on – and the bulbs are what is important to us. So, they all have to be cut off. And since we can’t stand to waste anything, we are working on finding ways to use them. They have great taste and very tender and the texture fabulous.  Get them early!

I cut a five gallon bucket full of these Garlic Scapes

I cut a five gallon bucket full of these Garlic Scapes

Fortunately, they are really wonderful in pesto, because we get all the great flavor and they get completely ground up, so texture isn’t an issue. And we LOVE pesto. I make as much of it as I can every summer and freeze it in ice cube trays to enjoy through the winter. Once the pesto is frozen solid, you can just pop the cubes out of the tray and store them in ziplock bags or other containers. You do want to have some trays dedicated solely to pesto and like substances though – the ice cube trays will absorb the flavor and pesto flavored iced tea is surprisingly un-tasty.

Garlic Pesto Ingerdents

Garlic Pesto Ingerdents

You will likely be able to find garlic scapes at your local Farmer’s Market this time of year, or maybe even in your CSA box. If you know someone who grows garlic, they might have some to share – they are worth looking for!

Garlic Scape Pesto

Serves: 1 & ½ cups
Ingredients
  • ½ cup chopped garlic scapes
  • ½ cup grated parmesan cheese
  • ⅓ cup lightly toasted pine nuts or almonds
  • ½ cup fresh basil, packed tightly – then roughly chopped
  • juice of ½ lemon
  • kosher salt & fresh ground pepper to taste
  • ⅓ cup good quality olive oil
Instructions
  1. Add everything but the oil to the bowl of a food processor
  2. Process until everything is finely chopped and almost a paste.
  3. Leave the processor running and stream in oil
  4. It will only take a moment of two for the mixture to emulsify – turn off processor.
  5. Leave at room temperature for an hour or so to develop flavors- keep plastic wrap pressed to top surface to keep the top from turning brown.
  6. Can be stored in the refrigerator for several days, or can be frozen.

garlic scape pestoGarlic Scape Pesto is wonderful anywhere that you would use ordinary pesto – on vegetables, pasta, in sandwiches, topping a bowl of soup – just about anything, really. Experiment to find how you like to use it most!  I will be taking this on a camping trip with friends and using this in my dinner preparations.

Enjoy your Garden and Farm, and all it has to offer!

Laurie

Your Health…Powered by BEES!

Luke 11:13 NIV  If you then, though you are not perfect, know how to give good gifts to your children, how much more will your Father in heaven give the Holy Spirit to those who ask him!”

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Busy Bees, Busy Times and Good News for Busy People

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Clover, Bee, and Revery

Reverie (revery) –(n.) state of dreamy meditation or fanciful musing; a fantastic, visionary, or impractical idea

Psalms from the Hive, by Jeannie Saum

Bees and people buzzin’

Makin’ lots of new

Traveling, building gathering

And of course, tasting, too!

News of healing warms us.

Wounds, infections, and more stuff.

BEE treasures bless us!

Our new bees are installed and thriving.  They have been busy this spring bringing in stores of nectar and pollen, building comb and making honey, all so their queen can lay eggs.  We will reap the benefits of their hard work by collecting pollen and honey from the hives in the very near future.   We have been busy as well, making our bee-treasure- laden products and visiting markets and festivals.  We can be found at Pearl Market, downtown, every Friday from 10:30-2:00, through June.  We recently traveled to Delaware, Ohio for their great Arts Festival, and will be teaching about Hive Treasures and selling our wares at the Ohio State Beekeepers Conference at Miami University this coming weekend.

Along the way, we have gotten some great positive feedback from customers who’ve had success with our bee-hive products.  We met a couple at the Delaware Arts Festival who bought Pet and Poultry Wound Salve to try on their young chicken pullets, who had been pecked badly by the flock.  Mehgan recently wrote to us to report their success.

“I met you (along with my husband) last weekend at Delaware. We purchased some propolis and wound salve for our chickens. We’ve been using it on two of our pullets that were picked on. One had a dime sized wound and the other had a 1″ cut in her neck, both to the bone. We have been using the wound salve daily and the pullet with the dime size wound has completely healed after 6 days. The wound was deep enough that you could see her skull and at this point she just needs her feathers to grow back! The other pullet’s skin has fused and all signs of necrosis and infection are gone. The wound was very bad but is healing faster than we had hoped!  Just wanted to share the positive news!”

They took before and after pictures of one of their birds.

"before " picture of wound

“before ” picture of wound

"after" Propolis treatment

“after” Propolis treatment

 

Mehgan reports,

“The “before” picture was taken 3 days after she was attacked.  The wound was completely through the skin and to her muscle.  She was given the wound salve for 1 week and the after picture is 2 days after we stopped putting the salve on. “

  • A family our daughter was working with had success in healing up a dinner-plate-sized bedsore on their son’s back with wound salve.
  •   A friend of ours called to thank us for the great wound salve, that gave her relief from an itchy rash on her legs that were keeping her from sleeping.  She got instant relief when she remembered to use the wound salve!
  • A couple who bought propolis oil at the Pearl Alley Market, to treat their little dog’s ear infection came by the next week, to tell us it had worked.
  • Another lady tried our propolis oil sample on a wound when we were at Pearl Alley market 2 weeks ago.  She came back to buy some this past Friday, due to the healing of her wound!

People are finding out, what we already know – PROPOLIS IS AMAZING!

 Psalm 18

30 As for God, his way is perfect: The Lord’s word is flawless;he shields all who take refuge in him.
31 For who is God besides the Lord? And who is the Rock except our God?
32 It is God who arms me with strength and keeps my way secure.
33 He makes my feet like the feet of a deer; he causes me to stand on the heights.
34 He trains my hands for battle; my arms can bend a bow of bronze.
35 You make your saving help my shield, and your right hand sustains me; your help has made me great.
36 You provide a broad path for my feet, so that my ankles do not give way.

 

New Questions, Some Answers

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Clover, Bee, and Revery

Reverie (revery) –(n.) state of dreamy meditation or fanciful musing; a fantastic, visionary, or impractical idea

Psalms from the Hive, by Jeannie Saumdelasware2may14

Pack and drive, drive and unpack.

Pack it up again head down the track 

Tent up, products out

Talking to customers all about

Good questions asked around

Some with answers, some without.

Last weekend, we took BEEpothecary on the road to the Delaware Arts Festival.  It was well organized and there was a super crowd, even in the rain on Saturday.  And boy do the people in Delaware love their dogs, many of whom accompanied their owners to the festival!  We had a great time sharing about amazing bee hive products to a receptive crowd.  People were very interested to learn about something new.  And, we had a few questions from customers that we didn’t know the answers to.  So, as usual, I had to come home and do some research.

One question we had was the effect of propolis on Lyme disease.  I didn’t know much about Lyme disease, and was quite shocked at the many complications and life-long issues this disease creates.  I could not find any specific research on propolis to treat Lyme disease, though it has shown effectiveness on many of the secondary infections that can accompany Lyme.  I did find it mentioned on several web forums, as a treatment for early stage Lyme disease.  Laurie also reminded me that we’d has an email from a missionary family asking to buy propolis, as they were using it to treat the husband and son who had contracted Lyme disease.  Since propolis is a natural antimicrobial, it certainly wouldn’t hurt to try it.  Since everyone’s body is different, it may work for some.

Delawaremay14Another customer asked about the shelf life of propolis oil.  She thought she had read that olive oil could go rancid.  From what I have read, olive oil is one of the most stable oils out there.  It can last 3-4 years in a tightly sealed, dark bottle, kept in a cool place.  And even if rancid, it will taste bad but is still edible.  I have read that herbal infused oils can be source of botulism, due to the water content in the herbs used for the infusion.  In this case it is best to use dried herbs and keep the oil refrigerated.  Since propolis does not contain water, and kills bacteria, fungus, molds, and viruses, this should not be a problem with propolis oil.  We are still using proolis oil that is a year old.

A third question we had was about the effectiveness of propolis on kidney disease.  I did find several studies on animals with  diabetic nephropathy. Propolis treatment  given orally showed strong antioxidant effects which can improve oxidative stress (which causes tissue damage) and delay the kidney damage of diabetes mellitus. Another study showed propolis preparations are able to improve diabetic hepatorenal damage, probably through its anti-oxidative action and its detoxification process as well as the potential to minimize the destructive effects of free radicals on tissue. The protective role of propolis against  damages in diabetic mice gives a hope that they may have similar protective action in humans.  These two studies and several others can be found at http://nih.gov and search propolis and diabetic nephropathy.

 

Proverbs 2

1My son, if you accept my wordsand store up my commands within you,
turning your ear to wisdom and applying your heart to understanding—
indeed, if you call out for insightand cry aloud for understanding,
and if you look for it as for silverand search for it as for hidden treasure,
then you will understand the fear of the Lordand find the knowledge of God.
For the Lord gives wisdom;from his mouth come knowledge and understanding.
He holds success in store for the upright,he is a shield to those whose walk is blameless,
for he guards the course of the justand protects the way of his faithful ones.

 

 

 

 

 

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